Category archives: beauty

 

Meet Robin, the owner of Brandywine Botanicals. ” Robin’s experience in floral design contributes to an appreciation of artistic balance. She has always had an interest in unique fragrances and has spent the last several years researching products and learning about ingredients sourced from around the world. “–http://www.brandywinebotanicals.com


How did you become a perfumer?

I seem to change careers like most people change jobs and a natural fragrance business brings me full circle to my first job as a floral designer.  Both floral and fragrance design are creative outlets that are based on design principles; they are a wonderful blend of art and science. One of the shops I worked at had a large garden center where it was easy to learn about plants, their care and their fragrance.  I lived in the San Francisco Bay area for a while and the plants are amazing. There were rosemary shrubs and lemon trees growing in the yard and nonstop color all around me. Gardening was, and still is, a joy.  

 

Perfume is a blend of art and science.  Years as a critical care respiratory therapist required a background in science to understand our bodies and therapies used to treat injury and illness.  This ties into the chemistry aspect of fragrance.  We smell essential oils because they evaporate and that rate of evaporation is based on the size of the molecules and how they interact. Fragrance has an effect on our mood and often has therapeutic properties, something I am learning about through aromatherapy training. Experience in the corporate world comes in handy for running a small business.  Anyone who is a small business owner understands that you wear multiple hats and often do it all.   

 

So how did I become a perfumer? Blending essential oils and their beautiful scents was a hobby that grew after taking a single aromatherapy workshop. That workshop was followed by training with a very successful natural perfumer in Rhode Island.  The last several years have been spent trying different blends, learning about the essential oils and enjoying an olfactory trip around the world.

 

Do you have a particular style or approach to creating fragrances? 

The concept for a fragrance can come from several directions but blending always starts in my mind.  I may find a beautiful scent, like orange blossoms, try a new essential oil or simply read about a new ingredient or perfume that starts the creative process. The next step is similar to cooking. Just as you have an idea of what seasoning will work in a recipe, I consider what essential oils or botanicals will work together. For instance, will a blend need the spark of a little citrus?  Perhaps a nice sandalwood as the base?  Following design principles means using specific fragrance ‘notes’ together so you can smell a top note after applying the fragrance and experience a smooth transition to middle notes and the final base notes that last the longest for what is called the ‘dry down’. Then the fun really begins as I place a drop or two of each ingredient onto a test strip and try different combinations. Because natural fragrance does not contain preservatives or longer-lasting synthetic fragrance chemicals, it rarely lasts as long as a synthetic.  The natural perfumer must carefully blend the fragrance notes and use essential oils that have fixative properties that help the overall blend last a bit longer.  Creating a beautifully balanced blend is the artistry of natural fragrance. 

 

Tell me about your favorite in the collection?

Almost Summer is a favorite because it was one of my first blends and it is a simple, beautiful orange blossom fragrance.  It reminds me of driving along orange groves when the trees are in bloom.  Everywhere you look you see the small white blossoms and their sweet, warm fragrance is carried by the breeze. It is a nice warm-weather fragrance and is uplifting during the colder months.

 

What projects are you currently working on and where do you want to take your business in the future? 

This spring is a big turning point for Brandywine Botanicals.  I will complete aromatherapy certification training in July and plan to offer an aromatherapy collection. This is likely to include a fragrant oil for massage or moisturizing and an aromatherapy spray that can be used to fragrance the home, linens and the skin.  That is the beauty of natural ingredients: they can serve more than one purpose with less concern than something made from petroleum products as many home fragrances are. Certification also opens the door to starting a small practice where custom blends can be offered to those with a specific need.  I work from my home studio so sell online and at local events but would like to find a small studio/retail space to offer fragrance, host workshops and support an aromatherapy practice.  Location is challenging for a small business but I am always on the lookout for unique opportunities so stay tuned!

 

Meet talented Hattie, from a ballerina to a sculptor. Now she is a self taught hand crafted jewelry designer in Kennett Square.

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What did you do before you start jewelry design?

When I was 4 years old I began intensive training in ballet. I was pigeon-toed and the doctor advised my mother that ballet would help straighten my legs. I quickly ended up taking 10 classes a week and when I was 14, I was accepted into The School of American Ballet at Juilliard in New York City. After that, I was a principal ballerina with the Brandywine Ballet Company for 9 years and, later, danced with Opus 1 Contemporary of Philadelphia as well as guest performed with many theatres and other dance companies. I began teaching ballet in 2001 and only recently have had to cut back to one day a week as it’s all my growing jewelry schedule will allow. In my early twenties, I also modeled as a ballerina for a sculpture class and found myself eager to learn how to sculpt. I took a class and began sculpting, later exhibiting my bronze dancers locally in galleries and art exhibits.

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What lead you to beginning to work with jewelry?

In 2006, I stopped dancing professionally and began my family. I enjoyed sculpture but it was expensive to have bronzed. But, without dance or sculpture, I found I still needed an artistic outlet. I picked up an instructional book on beading and wirewrapping at a local craft store and that night I think I made 30 pairs of earrings. I was hooked.

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Where do you find your inspiration?

My inspiration comes from everything around me. I love to garden and often am inspired by nature and its beauty and movement. I am currently fascinated with ancient Egyptian artifacts and patinas. I typically don’t sketch out or plan my designs. I have a general idea or inspiration, start grabbing materials and get to work.

 

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Who do you envision wearing your work? Do you think about this when you work on designs?

I strive to make jewelry that people want to wear. I try to make a variety that appeals to all ages and styles. I believe it is important to learn as many techniques as you can but that doesn’t mean you need to pull out all the stops in every single creation. I often find that the pieces people find the most appealing are the simplest.

 

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The most meaningful piece of jewelry you own is?

My favorite piece is my ‘Wrapped in Lavender Cuff’. It was the most technically challenging piece I have ever made and, because of that, the most rewarding. It was a lengthy process but when I finished it, I remember feeling proud of myself.

 

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Do you have a favorite jewelry designer that you admire?

I admire so many artists but I guess you could say my idol is jewelry artist, Jeanine Payer. She has recently closed her studio doors but I was fortunate to have been given a couple of her pieces and absolutely fell in love with the simplicity and feminine quality of her work. It remains an inspiration to me.

 

Check Hattie’s work here: Hattie Weselyk Jewelry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After two years renovating  an old  farm house, Mary and her family moved to their beautiful  new home. Mary also found her calling in home interior design, organization  and garden design. The EDIT was born. It is a personal, client-centered service providing home order and organization.

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1. What determined your passion for design?

I fell into this. EDIT evolved from my totally control freak nature! As a kid I would re arrange my parents furniture when they went out of town. It didn’t go over well.
As an adult, I’ve lived in a few houses (we seem to move around) and design and order (for me) are a natural part of the move in/move out/nesting and home making process. Creating good and pleasing spaces for life and family is a creative and satisfying endevour for me. But really, I’m a control freak.

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2. Can you describe your first Edit project?

My very first EDIT project was a whole house re order, deckutter and staging for sale process. It was a completed over the summer and the home sold shortly thereafter.
I love to bring order. And the backbone and essence of EDIT is just that. Order. Be it in a basement or closet.

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3. What inspires you?

I’m a always deeply inspired by my amazing friend family. The people who impact my thoughts and heart are truly exceptionally talented humans. I am very lucky to have them. I’ve watched each one of them take flight in their own distinct efforts and I finally feel as though I’m catching up!

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4.Share something you would like the world to know about you or your ideas.

I get my inspiration from a life lived at home. My ideas are influenced by the spaces I have lived in, by the objects and stuff of life I’ve acquired and love and always always always from the natural world. I am certainly no expert on design but I do know what I love. And I do absolutely love what I do with EDIT.

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5. if you have no limits( money, resources), what would you create?

The world as my oyster would truly be endless gardening! Endless. There would be no blade of grass unturned! It would be a boisterous messy flowering world in my garden.

 

  1. sikis izle said:
    Olá eu amo o cabeçalho do seu blog, é uma criação pessoal?
    May 2, 2016  10:58 am
    Reply
  2. Maike Singelmann said:
    Mary is incredible. She can get more done in a day than the rest of us can only dream to attempt in a lifetime. She is one of the most beautiful people I know inside and out. I'm lucky to call her my friend.
    March 7, 2017  7:00 pm
    Reply

Annabelle is a high school senior at Kennett Square high school. She plays flute, and also she is part of the CACC Folk Dance Troupe in Delaware.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

This question always makes me feel like I should have everything figured out, but the reality is, I’m honestly not sure what I want to be when I grow up. I’ve applied to college as an international relations major, but I don’t know what kind of job I want from that. I chose international relations as my major because I’m hoping that I can find a job that genuinely helps people but also allows me to continue using my Chinese. I long to impact the world, but I’m not sure exactly what I want to do; I guess that’s why I’m going to college- to figure life out.
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What’s the life like be a 17 year girl? 

I always think it’s so strange that I’m only one year away from being legal. 17 seems so old, yet so young. I think being 17 is about starting to come into your own–starting to understand who you are, what makes you tick, and who you want to be. You start to realize who you’re actually friends with and what you need from friends and relationships. Being 17 is about making memories and having experiences; it’s about making mistakes and learning from them. As a senior in high school, being 17 also means desperately trying to juggle six AP classes, college applications, extracurriculars, while maintaining some semblance of a social life. Personally, I’ve given up a bit on the social life. It’s a good life once you’re done with college applications, but until then, it’s incredibly stressful. 17 is a good age though. It’s a bit of a limbo age, as you’re still your parent’s child and you’re still making all the same stupid mistakes teenagers make, but at the same time, you or your friends can drive, so you have a lot more freedom, and you’re nearly an adult. I’m curious about being 18, really. I wonder if I’ll feel more mature or if I’ll act the same, despite knowing I’m legally an adult. As for now, I’m enjoying this limbo between the teenage years and legality.

Do you like small town or big city , and why?

I’m used to Kennett by this point, and I love it here. Downtown Kennett is one of my favorite places to go with my friends, whether it’s for a lavender latte at Talula’s Table, a crepe at Yo’r So Sweet, sushi at Lily’s, browsing at the Green Eyed Lady, or tea shopping at Mrs. Robinson’s. Honestly, the list of things to do isn’t the longest, but it’s more than enough and is near and dear to my heart. But when I’m in Taiwan (where my mother is from), we’ll travel to Taipei and I’ll fall in love with the city lights and endless hustle and bustle of the streets. Everything is so exciting, and there’s always something new to be found right around the next street corner. When I look at both together, though, there’s something nice about the familiarity of a small town. The anonymity of a big city scares me sometimes–I feel like a little ant among millions of others, ready at any second to get trampled over. In a small town, I feel more recognized and comfortable, as you’re always coming across someone you know. Friendly waves and smiles are integral to a small town, and for that reason, I have to say I like small towns more.  

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What’s the last thing you cried about ? 

I had to think about this, actually. The last time I cried wasn’t too recently (thankfully), although I can definitely think of some times I’ve cried this school year. It’s been stressful. My physics class has been killing me lately, so there’s a good chance I cried about not being able to do the homework and feeling entirely hopeless. I’ve never done so poorly in a class, let alone felt so hopeless and lost. It’s led to some sleepless nights and discussions with my parents and guidance counselor about changing to the lower AP class, but in the end, I’ve decided to grin and bear it. Besides, what’s life without a few tears?

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What’s the most happiest moment in your life?

I had to think a lot about this question, and I really don’t have an answer. I’ve had some really great days in my life, but few of them stand out to me. After thinking about this for awhile, though, I noticed that the days I thought of were actually rather ordinary days.

For instance, a remember feeling rather happy after simply enjoying a stress-free afternoon with my sisters and mom in downtown Kennett. We enjoyed a delicious lunch at Lily’s and then decided to visit the Growing Tree and try on some silly clothes, back before it switched to only toys. When we left, we discovered it was pouring rain. We ran back to the car laughing, still on a mental high from taking the time to do something so fun and relaxing after ages and ages of being in school. Our happiness contrasted the rain greatly, and I suppose that irony has made it hard for me to forget that day.

Another great memory of mine is skipping up a long ramp with my dearest friend, Katie, and just belting out “We’re off the see the wizard! The wonderful wizard of Oz!” We skipped until we couldn’t and then we stopped and burst into a fit of giggles. Of course, everyone was looking at us like we were crazy, but we were just having fun and enjoying each other’s company.

Now that I’m going off to college, days like these are the ones I cherish most. My family won’t be around anymore, and my friend Katie is already in college. The time I spend with my best friends and family is ticking away by the second, and seizing the few moments I can with them to make more great memories is more important than ever. So I definitely don’t have a best day (at least not yet), but I can honestly say that some of my best memories are simply snapshots of a single day, snapshots of when I am the happiest.

 

Emily and Andrew are the owners of  Tribe Beauty Culture. They create a boutique style hair , makeup and workshop place. It’s not a normal salon,  you will  enjoy your visit in a stylish environment and relaxing atmosphere.

 

Where is the name Tribe come from ?

Tribe started off with my sister and I wanting to make an impact. We were the original Tribe, a couple each with our own skills—hair and makeup. The idea was to create a culture of beauty, where we empower clients to recreate the same looks and styles from Tribe with the knowledge, technique, and tools. Since we started, my sister has had to relocate and Tribe has become a husband and wife team. We are still very much a “Tribe“. We started off small with big ideas, and every time a new client walks in the door, it’s important they feel they are a part of the Tribe.
What is the difference between Tribe and other hair Salon?
Tribe is different from other salons in the sense that our clients gain an intimate a personal experience each time they come in. They are given the attention they deserve in a relaxing setting that feels unlike any hair salon they’ve ever visited. Our stylists are amazing and skilled and focus on giving each client the knowledge they need to recreate looks and styles. We keep it simple—great hair and beautiful makeup.
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Every one loves Tribe’s interior design. You have very unique vision about interior design,  where do you get your ideas?
Andrew and I both believe very much in inspiration and creating a story with Tribe’s environment. My background is visual design and merchandising while Andrew’s is graphic design. We are able to work together and utilize our strengths to create a dynamic setting. The short answer—it seems to just come natural to us!
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How do you feel like having two jobs?
Andrew and I both work full-time jobs. Balancing that with Tribe can sometimes be stressful but also exciting. Tribe is our passion and if you love what you do, it never feels like work!
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Can you give some tips about how to do quick&easy everyday makeup?
Keep it simple. Start with a good foundation, literally. Invest in great skin care because thats where it all starts. Must haves for flawless complexion are a great foundation, killer mascara and a great lipstick.