Category archives: Fashion

 

Meet David, the owner of Unionville Saddle. David is a fashion designer, after living in New York for a decade he is bring his love of custom garment making back to here.

What sparked your interest in fashion?

Growing up I always had an interest in fashion, I remember reading GQ or sketching what my favorite pop stars’ were wearing but I was always more interested in fine arts.  I grew up painting and drawing and didn’t begin to sew until I was a senior in high school. I really got interested in fashion when I went to Parsons School of Design in NYC.  While I was studying I realized that fashion was a way to communicate  concepts while exploring traditional construction techniques and making people feel amazing.

What is your brand philosophy?

My brand philosophy revolves around the concept of Your Body Infinite Options.  Studying and working in the fashion industry for a decade opened my eyes to some major flaws in the current fashion system.  From not providing adequate sizing in stores to crippling runway and production costs I have decided to approach the business in a much different way by creating single pieces specifically to a client’s needs.  I believe that clients are looking for something that is made just for them, in the past women would have clothes made for them by dressmakers, working one on one to create something completely original and with a perfect fit for them.  My goal is to make every client feel at home while working with them to create pieces that will flatter every part of them, last, and look modern for years to come.

How do you describe your fashion and style?

I like when there is a mix of minimal clean lines and rawness, I love when frayed edges contrast the perfect fit.  There always needs to be a balance comfort and elegance, weight and lightness, color and texture.

What are you fascinated by at the moment and how does it feed into your work?

Currently, I am working with the concept of my transition from a city life in NYC to life in Unionville.  I have always used personal experience in life as my inspiration for my collections and this transition has been the most shocking and rewarding process of my life.

Talk us through the process of creating a garment. How long does it normally take to create a dress? what’s the procedure like?

Making a garment can take anywhere up to a year, particularly for bridal gowns.  The process always begins with a conversation, what do you need, when do you need it, what will the function be?  Then I will show a client some fabrics that may work with what they need and we begin to sketch. Once a design is selected I drape the piece, make a pattern, fit a muslin, and order the final fabric.  Once the pattern is corrected I cut the garment in final fabric, sew it, and fit the final piece. Depending on how complicated the garment is it may need more fittings to get the correct the fit.

Check David’s website and instagram for more information.

Meet Kelly, she is a Lawyer, Columnist, also a Blogger for Social Stylate.

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What was your dream job when you were a kid?

My dream job was to become a pediatrician. However, as a kid, I did not realize the plot twist looming in my future that I affectionately refer to as “Organic Chemistry”. Yikes.

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You are a lawyer, blogger, columnist, what’s next?

I am in the midst of changing careers! After many years of practicing family law and custody mediation, I decided to go back to school for a graduate degree in Clinical Mental Health. I am excited to help children and families transition through the divorce process from a therapeutic perspective, as opposed to a litigious one. 
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When and how did you start  your career in so many fields?
My family and friends like to tease me that I have as many jobs as there are hours in a day (which, at times, feels like an accurate statement!). However, at this point in my life, I am used to juggling a multitude of tasks. The “counselor” in me likes to help people and the “fashionista” in me loves to be surrounded by beautiful clothes, shoes, handbags, and make-up! I can’t possibly choose a favorite…so, I try to do it all. 
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What’s your typical day look like?
I rarely have a typical day! It’s possible for me to be facilitating a custody mediation in the morning, taking photos at No.109 Shop or Houppette for social media posts in the afternoon, and counseling in the early evening. In between those jobs, I try my best to be a good wife and mother. Although, if you were to look in my laundry room right now, you can tell that housekeeping is not on my list of daily chores. 
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What is your 5 tips for time management in a multitasking world?

Ugh, perfecting the art of multitasking is ever-evolving . While I am by NO means an expert, here are my best suggestions:
  • Write it down -I can’t survive without my Day Planner. I like to physically record my schedule with paper and pencil, as opposed to keeping notes on my phone. 
  • Exercise – This may sound silly, but, making a workout a priority is critical, in my opinion. It is easy to let the drudgery of daily life get in the way of self care. But, a good sweat is as important for your mind as it is for your body. 
  • Sleep – When I take on too much, I have a tendency to stay up really late trying to get everything accomplished. The result? I am cranky and totally unproductive the next day. Forcing myself to get a minimum of seven hours is a worthwhile mission. 
  • Delegate – Sometimes it is difficult to relinquish control to others (especially if you are a perfectionist, like I am). However, learning how to ask and accept help from others is important. 
  • Have FUN – Embrace your busyness! If you are running around like a chicken with your head cut off, you may as well be having a good time doing it. I work with some fabulous people who challenge and energize me and it makes the crazy schedule all worthwhile. 

Meet talented Hattie, from a ballerina to a sculptor. Now she is a self taught hand crafted jewelry designer in Kennett Square.

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What did you do before you start jewelry design?

When I was 4 years old I began intensive training in ballet. I was pigeon-toed and the doctor advised my mother that ballet would help straighten my legs. I quickly ended up taking 10 classes a week and when I was 14, I was accepted into The School of American Ballet at Juilliard in New York City. After that, I was a principal ballerina with the Brandywine Ballet Company for 9 years and, later, danced with Opus 1 Contemporary of Philadelphia as well as guest performed with many theatres and other dance companies. I began teaching ballet in 2001 and only recently have had to cut back to one day a week as it’s all my growing jewelry schedule will allow. In my early twenties, I also modeled as a ballerina for a sculpture class and found myself eager to learn how to sculpt. I took a class and began sculpting, later exhibiting my bronze dancers locally in galleries and art exhibits.

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What lead you to beginning to work with jewelry?

In 2006, I stopped dancing professionally and began my family. I enjoyed sculpture but it was expensive to have bronzed. But, without dance or sculpture, I found I still needed an artistic outlet. I picked up an instructional book on beading and wirewrapping at a local craft store and that night I think I made 30 pairs of earrings. I was hooked.

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Where do you find your inspiration?

My inspiration comes from everything around me. I love to garden and often am inspired by nature and its beauty and movement. I am currently fascinated with ancient Egyptian artifacts and patinas. I typically don’t sketch out or plan my designs. I have a general idea or inspiration, start grabbing materials and get to work.

 

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Who do you envision wearing your work? Do you think about this when you work on designs?

I strive to make jewelry that people want to wear. I try to make a variety that appeals to all ages and styles. I believe it is important to learn as many techniques as you can but that doesn’t mean you need to pull out all the stops in every single creation. I often find that the pieces people find the most appealing are the simplest.

 

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The most meaningful piece of jewelry you own is?

My favorite piece is my ‘Wrapped in Lavender Cuff’. It was the most technically challenging piece I have ever made and, because of that, the most rewarding. It was a lengthy process but when I finished it, I remember feeling proud of myself.

 

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Do you have a favorite jewelry designer that you admire?

I admire so many artists but I guess you could say my idol is jewelry artist, Jeanine Payer. She has recently closed her studio doors but I was fortunate to have been given a couple of her pieces and absolutely fell in love with the simplicity and feminine quality of her work. It remains an inspiration to me.

 

Check Hattie’s work here: Hattie Weselyk Jewelry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I knew Bri through Instagram. I have been followed her on Instagram long time. She is the designer-maker and owner of Arden and James. I love her beautiful  handcrafted bags. Finally I had a chance to do a photo shoot with her. I arrived her house, her younger son was sleeping, and the older boy was tired but won’t take a nap. He stayed with us whole time, during the photo shoot I saw how she balanced her work with kids. Her studio is stylish, bright and organized. She showed me her new work, and also the first bag she made. She is such a talented artist and wonderful mom.

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Where did the name Arden & James come from?
 
Arden is a little utopian arts community in Delaware. It was designed to demonstrate the values of the Arts + Crafts movement at the turn of the century. Many artists, musicians, actors, and craftsmen live there. There are walking paths through the woods connecting all of the homes and shared community facilities. Such a dream. They have an annual Arden Fair, which is in its 108th year.  As a kid, my grandparents’ house was closeby, and we would go to the Fair. It’s a magical place, and it has inspired me all my life.
 
James is my older son. I started the company when he was old enough to sit on his own and I got my hands back :). My husband is also a James. He is an artist as well – a musician.
 
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What is your design process?
The materials themselves drive my process.  I only use materials I love: organic woven linen, locally milled waxed canvas, vegetable tanned leather, and pure copper.  I see a natural material that inspires me and then decide what I can make that would highlight its best qualities. It’s sort of a backwards design process – not how I was trained in design school! I think that good design allows the materials to be themselves.
I love getting feedback from customers and friends. When designing something as personal as a handbag, I have to know how people will use it. I want my bags to be a reliable wardrobe staple and hopefully an heirloom, so the details need to be just right.
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What currently inspires you and which other artists do you admire and why?
 
Wharton Esherick. He was a sculptor and painter who resided in Paoli. His home and workshop are open to the public, and they are an endless source of inspiration for me. I hope to shoot my Fall lookbook there this year. It’s funny, but when I make something,  I ask myself – would this look good at Wharton’s house? It’s a “handcrafted modern” look. His work has no straight lines. It is informed by the materials and has a perfect organic feel. It’s just too good to put into words – you gotta see it.
What would you most like to make that you haven’t made so far?
Clothing. My sister, Britt, is amazing with styling, colors, and patterns – so it would be a collaborative line where I could choose the materials. My dream is to work with her every day (and our dogs and kids).
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How did your parents influence your career?
 
My parents always wanted us to do what made us happy. Just to be our true selves. My Dad was always working with wood, and my mom was a painter. My mom always said that I was an artist, and wanted me to pursue art as my career, but I never believed in myself enough to think that I could pull it off. After getting my degree in Industrial Design, I apprenticed for other artists, worked in food marketing, and organized community events to earn money. It wasn’t until after my mom passed away – five years ago – and I was pregnant with my first son, that I felt the drive to make things. I could feel my mom’s confidence in me pushing me along. Since then I am always inspired and can’t wait to make more. I feel that my mom is sending these things to me so that I can live my dream. Everything falls into place as long as I focus and do my best. People have responded so passionately to my work – and it’s so flattering – because it’s me being completely honest and putting my true self out there. My work is a reflection of me, and the relationships I have built from that are so authentic and rewarding.
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You are busy mom for two boys, how do you balance your work and kids?
The balance day-to-day is so hard, but overall, things work out. I am always going from one thing to the next, running around like a crazy person. But that’s how I work best. I am at home with the boys, so my attention has to be on them first. My boys are 2 and 4, so we don’t have any schedule – I just work in my home workshop when I can – mostly in 10 minute bursts throughout the day (on a good day). I use my iPhone for everything. I am never able to sit at the computer. The boys would be jumping all over me! I plan my work so that I can do handwork such as weaving in the car (while James is driving :)) or outside with the kids while they play. When the kids are both in school things will be easier. I had never imagined my business would grow so quickly – but I’m so proud that it has! The challenge keeps growing, but I’m still hanging in there!
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 To learn more about Bri and her work go to the website:Arden and James
  1. Estelle said:
    I absolutely loved this interview. Thanks, Bri, for sharing what it's like to be working at home with two children. I completely relate to the 10-minute bursts but I love and admire the fact that this does not stop you from being successful. You are showing your boys what a strong woman and mother looks like and I know this will inspire them for the rest of their lives.
    August 12, 2015  5:43 pm
    Reply
  2. Becky said:
    Bri I am so proud of what you have accomplished! I always knew you had what it takes! Beautiful boys and tell James hello!
    October 21, 2015  4:27 pm
    Reply

Annabelle is a high school senior at Kennett Square high school. She plays flute, and also she is part of the CACC Folk Dance Troupe in Delaware.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

This question always makes me feel like I should have everything figured out, but the reality is, I’m honestly not sure what I want to be when I grow up. I’ve applied to college as an international relations major, but I don’t know what kind of job I want from that. I chose international relations as my major because I’m hoping that I can find a job that genuinely helps people but also allows me to continue using my Chinese. I long to impact the world, but I’m not sure exactly what I want to do; I guess that’s why I’m going to college- to figure life out.
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What’s the life like be a 17 year girl? 

I always think it’s so strange that I’m only one year away from being legal. 17 seems so old, yet so young. I think being 17 is about starting to come into your own–starting to understand who you are, what makes you tick, and who you want to be. You start to realize who you’re actually friends with and what you need from friends and relationships. Being 17 is about making memories and having experiences; it’s about making mistakes and learning from them. As a senior in high school, being 17 also means desperately trying to juggle six AP classes, college applications, extracurriculars, while maintaining some semblance of a social life. Personally, I’ve given up a bit on the social life. It’s a good life once you’re done with college applications, but until then, it’s incredibly stressful. 17 is a good age though. It’s a bit of a limbo age, as you’re still your parent’s child and you’re still making all the same stupid mistakes teenagers make, but at the same time, you or your friends can drive, so you have a lot more freedom, and you’re nearly an adult. I’m curious about being 18, really. I wonder if I’ll feel more mature or if I’ll act the same, despite knowing I’m legally an adult. As for now, I’m enjoying this limbo between the teenage years and legality.

Do you like small town or big city , and why?

I’m used to Kennett by this point, and I love it here. Downtown Kennett is one of my favorite places to go with my friends, whether it’s for a lavender latte at Talula’s Table, a crepe at Yo’r So Sweet, sushi at Lily’s, browsing at the Green Eyed Lady, or tea shopping at Mrs. Robinson’s. Honestly, the list of things to do isn’t the longest, but it’s more than enough and is near and dear to my heart. But when I’m in Taiwan (where my mother is from), we’ll travel to Taipei and I’ll fall in love with the city lights and endless hustle and bustle of the streets. Everything is so exciting, and there’s always something new to be found right around the next street corner. When I look at both together, though, there’s something nice about the familiarity of a small town. The anonymity of a big city scares me sometimes–I feel like a little ant among millions of others, ready at any second to get trampled over. In a small town, I feel more recognized and comfortable, as you’re always coming across someone you know. Friendly waves and smiles are integral to a small town, and for that reason, I have to say I like small towns more.  

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What’s the last thing you cried about ? 

I had to think about this, actually. The last time I cried wasn’t too recently (thankfully), although I can definitely think of some times I’ve cried this school year. It’s been stressful. My physics class has been killing me lately, so there’s a good chance I cried about not being able to do the homework and feeling entirely hopeless. I’ve never done so poorly in a class, let alone felt so hopeless and lost. It’s led to some sleepless nights and discussions with my parents and guidance counselor about changing to the lower AP class, but in the end, I’ve decided to grin and bear it. Besides, what’s life without a few tears?

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What’s the most happiest moment in your life?

I had to think a lot about this question, and I really don’t have an answer. I’ve had some really great days in my life, but few of them stand out to me. After thinking about this for awhile, though, I noticed that the days I thought of were actually rather ordinary days.

For instance, a remember feeling rather happy after simply enjoying a stress-free afternoon with my sisters and mom in downtown Kennett. We enjoyed a delicious lunch at Lily’s and then decided to visit the Growing Tree and try on some silly clothes, back before it switched to only toys. When we left, we discovered it was pouring rain. We ran back to the car laughing, still on a mental high from taking the time to do something so fun and relaxing after ages and ages of being in school. Our happiness contrasted the rain greatly, and I suppose that irony has made it hard for me to forget that day.

Another great memory of mine is skipping up a long ramp with my dearest friend, Katie, and just belting out “We’re off the see the wizard! The wonderful wizard of Oz!” We skipped until we couldn’t and then we stopped and burst into a fit of giggles. Of course, everyone was looking at us like we were crazy, but we were just having fun and enjoying each other’s company.

Now that I’m going off to college, days like these are the ones I cherish most. My family won’t be around anymore, and my friend Katie is already in college. The time I spend with my best friends and family is ticking away by the second, and seizing the few moments I can with them to make more great memories is more important than ever. So I definitely don’t have a best day (at least not yet), but I can honestly say that some of my best memories are simply snapshots of a single day, snapshots of when I am the happiest.

 

Emily and Andrew are the owners of  Tribe Beauty Culture. They create a boutique style hair , makeup and workshop place. It’s not a normal salon,  you will  enjoy your visit in a stylish environment and relaxing atmosphere.

 

Where is the name Tribe come from ?

Tribe started off with my sister and I wanting to make an impact. We were the original Tribe, a couple each with our own skills—hair and makeup. The idea was to create a culture of beauty, where we empower clients to recreate the same looks and styles from Tribe with the knowledge, technique, and tools. Since we started, my sister has had to relocate and Tribe has become a husband and wife team. We are still very much a “Tribe“. We started off small with big ideas, and every time a new client walks in the door, it’s important they feel they are a part of the Tribe.
What is the difference between Tribe and other hair Salon?
Tribe is different from other salons in the sense that our clients gain an intimate a personal experience each time they come in. They are given the attention they deserve in a relaxing setting that feels unlike any hair salon they’ve ever visited. Our stylists are amazing and skilled and focus on giving each client the knowledge they need to recreate looks and styles. We keep it simple—great hair and beautiful makeup.
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Every one loves Tribe’s interior design. You have very unique vision about interior design,  where do you get your ideas?
Andrew and I both believe very much in inspiration and creating a story with Tribe’s environment. My background is visual design and merchandising while Andrew’s is graphic design. We are able to work together and utilize our strengths to create a dynamic setting. The short answer—it seems to just come natural to us!
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How do you feel like having two jobs?
Andrew and I both work full-time jobs. Balancing that with Tribe can sometimes be stressful but also exciting. Tribe is our passion and if you love what you do, it never feels like work!
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Can you give some tips about how to do quick&easy everyday makeup?
Keep it simple. Start with a good foundation, literally. Invest in great skin care because thats where it all starts. Must haves for flawless complexion are a great foundation, killer mascara and a great lipstick. 

When I started my project last year, this girl emailed me said she would love to be part of my project. I found her job is quite interesting. This is Patricia, she is the founder of Piqued PR–a full service boutique PR agency .

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What did you want to be when you were growing up?

The first thing I remember ever wanting to be when I was younger was a dance teacher. I grew up taking ballet, tap, jazz, etc. so my dream was to one day own a studio. Then there were years in high school where I thought I wanted to own a clothing boutique. Finally in college I decided upon PR. What stayed the same through all the years was my desire to be an entrepreneur and work creatively.

 

When and how did you start your business?

I started Piqued PR in spring of 2013. I worked at an agency in center city and freelanced on the side with lifestyle clients. Eventually I transitioned these freelance clients into Piqued PR!
 
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Where is the name Piqued come from?
I love a good word, especially one that starts with “P”. Piqued generally means to catch someone’s interest, essentially that’s what I’m doing for my clients… piquing the interest of press and consumers for them.
 
 
What do you find the most rewarding about your job?
The most rewarding part of my job is helping small businesses and entrepreneurs get the attention they deserve by helping consumers discover them through social media and various publications. I feel like I help them achieve their goals, all while they allow me to live my dream too!
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Can you give some social media marketing tips?
It’s all about visuals! Make sure you use the same filter in all you pictures and try to have at least one of your brand’s colors make it into everything you post. Also, interact with your followers and fans, ask questions, comment back, etc. It shouldn’t be a one way conversation.
 
 

I have lived in Kennett square almost 5 years. This is a small town, but full of interesting, cool people.
Suzie is one of my favorite people. She is a wardrobe stylist from Suzie Gaffney wardrobe consulting.
When I stepped in her newly finished stylish closet, I immediately fell in love with it. It represents her style very well.Here is my interview with her.

 

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how did you start your business?

I worked for years in a boutique and heard countless customers complain about how they didn’t even know what was in their closet or how to put it together. They were shopping aimlessly and felt frustrated. I knew I could help. One day I put my business plan down on paper and got to work and sketching out what a service based consulting could offer. Then I ordered business cards, created the website and started one client at a time.

What’s your styling philosophy?

Dress your outside to match who you are on the inside.

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What’s the process ?

I start with a full audit of the client’s wardrobe, piece by piece. From there together we edit out what is not working, discussing why during the process. Clothes are put back in an organized and efficient system that works for the client.Then we put together outfits based on the client’s needs and lifestyle. Going forward we create a shopping list to fill in the gaps. The process is collaborative and educational, and fun!

What are the top 5 must have items for everyday fashion?

*A tailored black blazer – goes with everything from dresses to t-shirts.
*A great white shirt (preferably a t-shirt and an oxford shirt) that can be dressed up or down.
*Well fitting denim in a cut that flatters your shape.
*A go-to dress that you can throw on and run out the door, depending on your personality this could be anything from a flower print shirt dress to a navy sheath.
*A classic denim jacket with stretch.

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Could you share one tip for keeping your closet organized?

One in one out. If you buy something new (shoes, a sweater, even socks) make sure to get rid of something that is no longer provided a use in your wardrobe. Sticking to this rule keeps you from drowning in too much stuff.

Let’s meet Bridget, she is the owner of  other people’s trash vintage clothing,  a fashion blogger , Assistant  buyer for Urban Outfitters.

It’s a beautiful sunny day when we went out for the photoshoot. I was waiting for her
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. She came out with this Vintage Lord and Taylor flowing floral dress. It’s such a beautiful moment!

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Where is the name “other people’s trash vintage” come from?

The name of my store really came from the name of my blog. When thinking of a name for my blog I thought about the old adage, “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.” Vintage clothing, although very beautiful and delicate, is essentially trash in the respect that it is something that its owner no longer wants and is disposed of by that person. It becomes treasure to its new owner who finds an appreciation for it.

Where do you find all the vintage clothes that you sell?

I never thrift and tell.

What is your favorite era of fashion and why?

I really love the glamour and rebellion of the 1920s but I also love the color and textiles of the 1960s. I would love to go to a party hosted by Jay Gatsby and Don Draper!

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Could you offer people one tip for how to style vintage clothing?

Mix and match vintage pieces with modern day looks to avoid looking too costume-y. Accessorize with confidence.

Where do you get your fashion inspiration from?

I do not find inspiration from one source but rather from all around me. It could be a person, place, or thing that catches my eye and is memorable. Always keep your eyes open! I like to use a mood board near my closet to group together images and ideas for outfits and styling.