Category archives: life

 

Meet David, the owner of Unionville Saddle. David is a fashion designer, after living in New York for a decade he is bring his love of custom garment making back to here.

What sparked your interest in fashion?

Growing up I always had an interest in fashion, I remember reading GQ or sketching what my favorite pop stars’ were wearing but I was always more interested in fine arts.  I grew up painting and drawing and didn’t begin to sew until I was a senior in high school. I really got interested in fashion when I went to Parsons School of Design in NYC.  While I was studying I realized that fashion was a way to communicate  concepts while exploring traditional construction techniques and making people feel amazing.

What is your brand philosophy?

My brand philosophy revolves around the concept of Your Body Infinite Options.  Studying and working in the fashion industry for a decade opened my eyes to some major flaws in the current fashion system.  From not providing adequate sizing in stores to crippling runway and production costs I have decided to approach the business in a much different way by creating single pieces specifically to a client’s needs.  I believe that clients are looking for something that is made just for them, in the past women would have clothes made for them by dressmakers, working one on one to create something completely original and with a perfect fit for them.  My goal is to make every client feel at home while working with them to create pieces that will flatter every part of them, last, and look modern for years to come.

How do you describe your fashion and style?

I like when there is a mix of minimal clean lines and rawness, I love when frayed edges contrast the perfect fit.  There always needs to be a balance comfort and elegance, weight and lightness, color and texture.

What are you fascinated by at the moment and how does it feed into your work?

Currently, I am working with the concept of my transition from a city life in NYC to life in Unionville.  I have always used personal experience in life as my inspiration for my collections and this transition has been the most shocking and rewarding process of my life.

Talk us through the process of creating a garment. How long does it normally take to create a dress? what’s the procedure like?

Making a garment can take anywhere up to a year, particularly for bridal gowns.  The process always begins with a conversation, what do you need, when do you need it, what will the function be?  Then I will show a client some fabrics that may work with what they need and we begin to sketch. Once a design is selected I drape the piece, make a pattern, fit a muslin, and order the final fabric.  Once the pattern is corrected I cut the garment in final fabric, sew it, and fit the final piece. Depending on how complicated the garment is it may need more fittings to get the correct the fit.

Check David’s website and instagram for more information.

Meet Kelly, she is a Lawyer, Columnist, also a Blogger for Social Stylate.

A25A3296

 

What was your dream job when you were a kid?

My dream job was to become a pediatrician. However, as a kid, I did not realize the plot twist looming in my future that I affectionately refer to as “Organic Chemistry”. Yikes.

A25A3253

You are a lawyer, blogger, columnist, what’s next?

I am in the midst of changing careers! After many years of practicing family law and custody mediation, I decided to go back to school for a graduate degree in Clinical Mental Health. I am excited to help children and families transition through the divorce process from a therapeutic perspective, as opposed to a litigious one. 
A25A3241
When and how did you start  your career in so many fields?
My family and friends like to tease me that I have as many jobs as there are hours in a day (which, at times, feels like an accurate statement!). However, at this point in my life, I am used to juggling a multitude of tasks. The “counselor” in me likes to help people and the “fashionista” in me loves to be surrounded by beautiful clothes, shoes, handbags, and make-up! I can’t possibly choose a favorite…so, I try to do it all. 
A25A3270a
What’s your typical day look like?
I rarely have a typical day! It’s possible for me to be facilitating a custody mediation in the morning, taking photos at No.109 Shop or Houppette for social media posts in the afternoon, and counseling in the early evening. In between those jobs, I try my best to be a good wife and mother. Although, if you were to look in my laundry room right now, you can tell that housekeeping is not on my list of daily chores. 
A25A3289

What is your 5 tips for time management in a multitasking world?

Ugh, perfecting the art of multitasking is ever-evolving . While I am by NO means an expert, here are my best suggestions:
  • Write it down -I can’t survive without my Day Planner. I like to physically record my schedule with paper and pencil, as opposed to keeping notes on my phone. 
  • Exercise – This may sound silly, but, making a workout a priority is critical, in my opinion. It is easy to let the drudgery of daily life get in the way of self care. But, a good sweat is as important for your mind as it is for your body. 
  • Sleep – When I take on too much, I have a tendency to stay up really late trying to get everything accomplished. The result? I am cranky and totally unproductive the next day. Forcing myself to get a minimum of seven hours is a worthwhile mission. 
  • Delegate – Sometimes it is difficult to relinquish control to others (especially if you are a perfectionist, like I am). However, learning how to ask and accept help from others is important. 
  • Have FUN – Embrace your busyness! If you are running around like a chicken with your head cut off, you may as well be having a good time doing it. I work with some fabulous people who challenge and energize me and it makes the crazy schedule all worthwhile. 

Meet Lele– the multi-talented artist. She is a painter, sculptor, writer. She also own and run a local winery Galer Estate Vineyard & Winery in Kennett Square.

A25A2466b

How and when did you first become seriously interested in art?

I was raised around art and went to art museums and galleries since I could walk (that is the same for my children too). Studio art always came very naturally to me and I received a lot of attention for it, so I wasn’t very interested in it, but I was always serious about art history. I started college as a passionate art history major, until one day I had a conversation with a friend about Klimt, that made me rethink how I was learning about art… I had been dissecting and memorizing. All the over-intellectualization of the art had pulled me away from the ability to see..and I’d forgotten what had drawn me to art history it in the first place. I am very passionate about art history now, but it is personalized by knowing how to see and how to be moved to see in a new way. I still today  read tons of art history books, but not to memorize the facts, but instead just to understand things better. The breadth and history and presence of artistic creativity is very exciting to me…it is a shared sizzling current that runs through everyone and through time.

I started a serious interest in art education and public art when my sons were little.  I used my art ability to enable me to be in the schools with my children..and one thing led to another – I fell in love with working with the kids in the schools, all ages ranging from pre-school to high school.  I found excitement and much joy in teaching art history or art appreciation as well as public art. I still run a big school art appreciation program that I love, but I shy away from public art now (after 60+ projects now in Seattle, Westchester NY and Chester County).  Public art is a great thing when done with the right intentions. When people come together to make an art piece for their classroom, school, or community, it is fun and creative and pretty of course, but they like leaving a little piece of themselves in the artwork that they remember.  This is part of giving back to the world around them. Very cool..and but also extremely time and labor intensive.

About 2005 I started running art shows, and began taking classes, just for me, to see if I still had any sort of a gift left.  The combination of having art show deadlines and falling back in love with the medium, got me seriously interested in making art- really for the first time in my life. 

A25A2522a

What do you think is the most important influence in your painting?

No particular place, person or thing… I am influenced by looking -I am constantly looking at paintings and other pieces of art, including functional art such as furniture. When I am drawn to one, I try to figure out both how the artist does what they do, and what specifically draws me to a particular piece. “Looking” is a constant sifting through of visual edits, a lot goes in the discard pile, and the rest is organized and reshuffled for color, mood, something interesting, and relationships to things like time, history, my work or another artist’s work. The more I see, the more I learn about the art form and about why I am a painter. I am almost 55 and I still struggle with the idea of being an artist with a specific voice…what am I working towards in the art piece; where to edit and where to pile it on; there are always questions and challenges in every piece. I definitely would not paint or sculpt if there were no challenges. To have an original voice is both a difficult and an interesting journey.

In college, my end of the year art history paper had to be on a contemporary piece in the Hartford Museum, and I decided to pick something I absolutely hated just as a test to see if I would like it any better after I learned about it. I picked Franz Kline, who I thought was rubbish, and after working through it -he is one of my favorites. I definitely appreciate things more if there is a struggle involved.

I guess the biggest art influence was at Berkeley when an art teacher showed me how to bleed out a line and morph it into more painting than drawing. That was the first time I really painted (real painting, not filling with color), and I never went back to drawing after that. I also only did black and white, no color, until my mid-twenties. That is why my colors are so charged up now; I feel the need to punch them up to give me the same strength of feeling that I got from using black and white. I am trying to tone my color down now, but that is hard, which makes it interesting.. but toning it down is definitely not easy for me. I might go back to black and white.

 

A25A2413a

Can you talk a little bit  about your first sculpture?

Wow. That was fun – talk about an electric current. I had never done 3-D, and decided to take the plunge at Stan Smokler’s workshop one summer. It was an instant pure jolt of fun that had no layers of experience tied to it. I was mesmerized by the details, the metal bits and making a thing that was fully round. The first piece was a column made of sinewy found bits that worked their way up to make a whole. It was heavy and it sold immediately. Most of my pieces are abstract combinations of “bound” and unbound” elements. I am drawn to the idea of energy all bundled up and the thrill of being freed. Right now I am trying to learn more about the medium, rather than just be expressive. That involves a lot more grinding and busy work and is less appealing to me than the spontaneity of creating a sculptural piece…but I owe it to the medium to learn more about it. The more I learn about working with steel, the better I can realize the ideas I have..I hope so anyhow. But grinding is a bore and chips away at the little individualistic bits that I like…just like me trying to tone down color in my paintings, I’m not sure tidying up my metal work and making the welds smooth is very “me”, but I am interested in figuring that out.

A25A2489

Do you work certain hours each day or only when you are inspired to work?

I only work when I have a show or commission that is two weeks away or less. I keep hoping that I will schedule art every day, but I don’t. Making art has to be exciting for me, or I will do something else that is. The deadline makes it more exciting and pushes me to finished works as opposed to a lot of exploratory scribbling.

A25A2493

A25A2621

 

You are painter, sculptor, writer, and also run a winery in Kennett Square, how do you balance work and life?

Well, I don’t know how to relax, so as long as I am busy doing interesting things, then I am very happy. My husband and sons help keep me balanced, and art helps to shake things up.

 

Check Lele’s work here: http://www.lelegaler.com/

 

 

Meet Tom, the owner of Macaluso bookstore. I was lived near his store four years ago. Every time I passed by it, I was wondering what’s inside. Finally I had chance to meet him.

t2

 

What did you do before you open your  bookstore?

I  had been a law book and document editor for a few years after college and law school.  When my wife Brenda and  I started the book business  42 years ago I had already gone to graduate school and had a thirty-five year career as a law and English professor and dean.  I retired from  higher education 18 years ago to devote full time to the bookstore.

t1

 

Why a bookstore?

I started  collecting books when I was 14 years old and have always  loved them .

t8

 

t7

What make your bookstore special?

Our books, maps, and prints are special because they are relatively scarce and of lasting interest.  Unlike other used bookstores, our store’s books are mostly the original first edition hardbacks in very  good condition and some are hundreds of years old though some are relatively recentl though notable publications.

t5

t9

What book is your greatest treasure & why?

Right now,  I have first editions signed by the  Wyeths, T..S. Eliot, Carl  Sandburg, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Franklin  Delano Roosevelt, and many others.  And I have first editions by Hemingway, Orwell, Darhl, Dickens, Harper Lee, and thousands more and on every subject from art to zoology  They are virtually all my treasures.

A25A9926

t6

What’s the hardest thing about running your shop? What’s the best thing?

It can be difficult to help visitors appreciate the physical beauty of the book, that is the book arts.  The best experiences are the talks about books, education, and life itself especially with young people.

 

 

 

 

Meet talented Hattie, from a ballerina to a sculptor. Now she is a self taught hand crafted jewelry designer in Kennett Square.

h3

What did you do before you start jewelry design?

When I was 4 years old I began intensive training in ballet. I was pigeon-toed and the doctor advised my mother that ballet would help straighten my legs. I quickly ended up taking 10 classes a week and when I was 14, I was accepted into The School of American Ballet at Juilliard in New York City. After that, I was a principal ballerina with the Brandywine Ballet Company for 9 years and, later, danced with Opus 1 Contemporary of Philadelphia as well as guest performed with many theatres and other dance companies. I began teaching ballet in 2001 and only recently have had to cut back to one day a week as it’s all my growing jewelry schedule will allow. In my early twenties, I also modeled as a ballerina for a sculpture class and found myself eager to learn how to sculpt. I took a class and began sculpting, later exhibiting my bronze dancers locally in galleries and art exhibits.

h5

What lead you to beginning to work with jewelry?

In 2006, I stopped dancing professionally and began my family. I enjoyed sculpture but it was expensive to have bronzed. But, without dance or sculpture, I found I still needed an artistic outlet. I picked up an instructional book on beading and wirewrapping at a local craft store and that night I think I made 30 pairs of earrings. I was hooked.

h4

Where do you find your inspiration?

My inspiration comes from everything around me. I love to garden and often am inspired by nature and its beauty and movement. I am currently fascinated with ancient Egyptian artifacts and patinas. I typically don’t sketch out or plan my designs. I have a general idea or inspiration, start grabbing materials and get to work.

 

h2

Who do you envision wearing your work? Do you think about this when you work on designs?

I strive to make jewelry that people want to wear. I try to make a variety that appeals to all ages and styles. I believe it is important to learn as many techniques as you can but that doesn’t mean you need to pull out all the stops in every single creation. I often find that the pieces people find the most appealing are the simplest.

 

h7

The most meaningful piece of jewelry you own is?

My favorite piece is my ‘Wrapped in Lavender Cuff’. It was the most technically challenging piece I have ever made and, because of that, the most rewarding. It was a lengthy process but when I finished it, I remember feeling proud of myself.

 

h6

ha10

 

Do you have a favorite jewelry designer that you admire?

I admire so many artists but I guess you could say my idol is jewelry artist, Jeanine Payer. She has recently closed her studio doors but I was fortunate to have been given a couple of her pieces and absolutely fell in love with the simplicity and feminine quality of her work. It remains an inspiration to me.

 

Check Hattie’s work here: Hattie Weselyk Jewelry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Lauren, she is a Traditional Western Herbalist and founder of Areté herbs. I visited her lovely studio the other day. I really like her natural  and healthy life style.

L3

Where does the name Areté come from and what does it mean? 

Areté is a Greek word that means “excellence of any kind.” Areté describes the act of living up to one’s fullest potential, finding total fulfillment, and reaching the highest level of health and harmony for our mind, body, and spirit. Areté is a Stoic Philosophy term and I thought it embodied exactly what I was going for.

l2

What did you do before you started Areté Herbs? 
I was in school for most of my life up until the launch of my business! I am what they would call a 
“professional student.” I love to learn and went from undergraduate school to graduate school to my 
intensive herbalist training program, back to back.
I hold a Bachelor of Science Degree in Exercise Science and Nutrition, and a Master of Public Health 
(MPH) Degree concentrating in Integrative Health. In addition, I am certified as an Integrative Health 
Coach, and a certified Herbalist. I am also certified through the American College of Sports Medicine as 
an Exercise Physiologist (ACSM‐EP), and through the National Commission for Health Education 
Credentialing as a Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES). 
I have been employed as a Health Coach for The Chester County Hospital near Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, and as an Exercise Physiologist for the Dr. Dean Ornish Program for Reversing Heart 
Disease at Jefferson Regional Medical Center located near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
I was also honored to be a guest speaker at the 2010 annual meeting of the Pennsylvania Public Health 
Association (PPHA) held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. I presented a lecture entitled, “The Integrative 
Health Coach: A New Advocate for Health Promotion.”

l5

Why and how did you start Areté Herbs? 
My passion for plants, healing, and nature arose after several years of studying wellness, health and 
fitness. Despite my academic studies, I felt that a vital link was absent from the “complete” picture‐‐
there had to be more to health than just exercise and nutrition. Upon studying the ancient healing 
tradition of botanical medicine, I had found the piece that was missing.
Our health is deeply connected to nature. Living in harmony with the natural rhythms of the Earth and 
reconnecting with our inner wisdom is the essence of living a fulfilling, authentic, and purposeful
life.  Our health is so much more than just the absence of disease.

l4

What’s your philosophy about herbal medicine? 
Areté Herbs is a company dedicated to helping each individual achieve optimal health with plant‐based 
products.  At Areté, we believe that personal health is deeply connected to nature. To attain optimal 
wellness it is vital to embrace a more natural, earth‐centered approach to living fuller, healthier lives. 
 Plant medicine is a beautiful way to empower you on this journey.
We are a young, homegrown business that lovingly handcrafts all herbal products in small batches. We 
are wholly dedicated to organics, sustainability, and green business practices because of our great 
reverence for the environment. We promise to use only organic herbs to create our formulas.
Our herbs are sourced from only the most highly regarded companies that provide certified organically 
grown plants. Respectfully wild‐harvested herbs are often hand‐gathered by ourselves from rural 
Chester County, or grown in our personal garden that is free of pesticides, chemicals, and genetically
modified organisms (GMOs).
It is our hope that Areté’s herbal products give you the opportunity to infuse yourself in the medicine of
the plants.
l7
Can you recommend one herb that is easy to use and grow? 
I’ll name a handful! I had the best luck growing Sage, Catnip, Thyme, and Lemon Balm. These herbs 
seem to need hardly any attention at all and grew into huge, beautiful plants all by themselves. 
A lot of medicinal plants are considered common weeds and can be found in your own yard or woods 
behind your house! There is no need to plant an herbal garden if you learn to identify these common 
medicinal weeds. They grow on their own and very plentifully! Some include: Plantain, Chickweed, 
Dandelion, and Nettles to name a few! These are all considered tonic herbs. 
Dandelion, Chickweed, and Plantain can all be found in your lawn! Dandelion is great for digestion and 
liver function and is a key component of ourCardamom & Fennel Digestive Bitters. It is also found in our 
Immune Chai Tea, Nourish Tea, and Mommy‐To‐Be Tea.
Plantain can be made into a poultice to draw out a splinter or bee sting—great for summer first aid!
Chickweed is a Nutritive (very nutritious!) and is one of my favorite herbs. It tastes so yummy that you 
can add it to salads or even make a pesto from it!
It is also one of the herbs found in our Nourish Tea and our Mommy-To-Be Tea.
Stinging Nettles are found along rivers where the ground is moist. You can find them along the 
Brandywine River! The fresh plant is great for seasonal allergies, is a powerhouse of vitamins and 
minerals, and supports the adrenals to combat stress. We use it in our Allergy Formula, Nourish Tea,
Stress Free Tea, and Mommy‐To‐Be Tea.
.

Meet Carl, “Carl  is a former educator and business executive who has dedicated his retirement since 1997 toward helping children and adults discover the real George Washington. When you attend one of Carl’s highly entertaining presentations, you’ll realize his portrayal goes a lot deeper than simply dressing in a buff and blue uniform. Carl has spent countless hours poring through the General’s original writings. This allows him to communicate little known, instructive facts to audiences that range from elementary school classes and assemblies to business organizations and civic groups.”–www.gwashington.net

c4

 

When and how you did you start portray George Washington?

In 1997 I took an early retirement at age 55, and decided to portray George Washington.

 

A25A0373a

 

 

 

 

 

What the best part “be” George Washington?

As the :”Living Biographer” of George Washington, who exemplifies what it means to be an American, I can bring him to life for many people regardless of their age or education.

c5

c1

I heard you were invited as George Washington to a wedding, can you talk a little bit about that?

I have portrayed Washington at many wedding receptions with elan and decorum; it is always a special event for me as well as the wedding couple, to be a part in their most memorable day.
c3c2
Is there anything people don’t know about George Washington?
There’s a great deal which most people don’t know about George Washington; I myself am still learning what an amazing American he was.  That said, most people don’t know that he did not want to be President; he didn’t run for President; he belonged to no political party, and got all of the electoral votes.  By stepping down after his second term as President he established what was known as the two term tradition which continued for over a century.

 

 

 

 

After two years renovating  an old  farm house, Mary and her family moved to their beautiful  new home. Mary also found her calling in home interior design, organization  and garden design. The EDIT was born. It is a personal, client-centered service providing home order and organization.

m1

1. What determined your passion for design?

I fell into this. EDIT evolved from my totally control freak nature! As a kid I would re arrange my parents furniture when they went out of town. It didn’t go over well.
As an adult, I’ve lived in a few houses (we seem to move around) and design and order (for me) are a natural part of the move in/move out/nesting and home making process. Creating good and pleasing spaces for life and family is a creative and satisfying endevour for me. But really, I’m a control freak.

2

2. Can you describe your first Edit project?

My very first EDIT project was a whole house re order, deckutter and staging for sale process. It was a completed over the summer and the home sold shortly thereafter.
I love to bring order. And the backbone and essence of EDIT is just that. Order. Be it in a basement or closet.

5

 

3. What inspires you?

I’m a always deeply inspired by my amazing friend family. The people who impact my thoughts and heart are truly exceptionally talented humans. I am very lucky to have them. I’ve watched each one of them take flight in their own distinct efforts and I finally feel as though I’m catching up!

4

 

4.Share something you would like the world to know about you or your ideas.

I get my inspiration from a life lived at home. My ideas are influenced by the spaces I have lived in, by the objects and stuff of life I’ve acquired and love and always always always from the natural world. I am certainly no expert on design but I do know what I love. And I do absolutely love what I do with EDIT.

3

5. if you have no limits( money, resources), what would you create?

The world as my oyster would truly be endless gardening! Endless. There would be no blade of grass unturned! It would be a boisterous messy flowering world in my garden.

 

  1. sikis izle said:
    Olá eu amo o cabeçalho do seu blog, é uma criação pessoal?
    May 2, 2016  10:58 am
    Reply
  2. Maike Singelmann said:
    Mary is incredible. She can get more done in a day than the rest of us can only dream to attempt in a lifetime. She is one of the most beautiful people I know inside and out. I'm lucky to call her my friend.
    March 7, 2017  7:00 pm
    Reply

My daughter took a drawing and painting class at Y. After finished the classes, she showed me her paintings, I was amazed by her work and the way the teacher was teaching. I had a chance to meet the teacher–Beth, an artist who loves doing animals portraits and  teaching art to children.  I went to her house, she showed me all the fun things in her studio , and activities at the farm. I felt her love of  animals , and passion for painting and teaching.

A25A0132b

1.What’s your life like when you were a kid?

We had a Ton of fun,brought up on a 99 acre horse farm with horses and dogs and a lot of people.We worked hard on ponies and horses to re sell,or train for other people.My mother was a big hearted free spirit who stressed honesty and to treat other people the way you want to be treated.We got up early and worked hard,then got to do fun active activities all together with out many rules,but you gave it your all in spirit!

A25A0189

2.When and how did you start painting? 

I always doodled and loved looking at Art…When I was 16,I had a serious back operation,they said no riding horses for a while!!!..That was my life,Mom said ..whow what are you going to do…I thought if she doesn’t know..it is up to me..I said I’m going to Art School,,,,where one door shuts another one opens!!!My Art has given me so much pleasure and others!!

A25A0190

 

3. Why do you like to paint animals? 

I LOVE animals and feel I intrinsically..intuitively..connect to them,so to paint them enhances these feelings,plus it is a challenge!! I like being able to paint peoples animals so they have a piece of the love forever,it is such a deep feeling…I love painting them!!!!!!

A25A0191

4.What animal do you like most? why? 

Horses and Dogs and Big lions….They are free,,atheletic and pick who they trust,then are very loyal..and the partnership grows!!

A25A0274a

A25A0233a

5.Can you talk a little bit about your last trip to Africa?

My last trip to Africa was magical,I did a lot of sketching..being outside in nature focusing on such beauty of the land the animals and my connection with them was surreal…I wrote in my book…I am revolving with the Universe..which was all beauty and possibility for me!!! I felt totally centered and as if the Dear Lord was whispering in my ear,I’m Proud of you Beth,I do well with those Real Feelings,,I can’t wait to go back!!!

You can check Beth’s work here: http://www.bethsecor.com/

 

Murry was my ESL teacher when I was just moved to Kennett. At that time, I had no friends here, everything was new to me. Through his class, I made friends and improved my English. He was such a wonderful teacher. Thank you so much! Murry

A25A2065

 

1.what did you do before you became  English teacher?

Prior to embarking on my new career of English as a Second Language (ESL) instructor for adult learners with the Adult Literacy Program, I completed nearly forty years of DUPONT Co. employment.  At the time of my retirement in June of 2001, I had enjoyed a varied history of jobs in operations planning, domestic marketing, and foreign sales across numerous product lines.  Of course many years ago as a U.S. Army veteran of the AMEDS group at Madigan Hospital (WA) I had learned the useful trade of Medical Lab Technologist.  It was rewarding to be able to put that training to helpful use part-time at St. Francis Hospital Lab (DE) and blood bank for many years.  

 

2. How did you start? 

My wife and I began tutoring one-on-one with the ESL students almost 20 years ago.  Actually my wife, Peggy, got me involved after observing how much enjoyment she got working with some wonderful Hispanic ESL students.  While she maintained her tutoring of several individuals, we paired up to provide tutoring to a young couple with children.  This working couple studied diligently to improve their lives for employment opportunities and eventual U.S. citizenship. 
mu1
3. how long have you been teaching ESL class?
Then in 2002 the staff at the Adult Literacy Program invited me to give ESL classroom instruction a try.  I accepted and took on the daytime multi-level ESL classes held several times a week at Presbyterian Church of Kennett Square.  Thanks to the generosity of the church, the support of the Kennett Public Library, and the persistence of our Program’s staff I’ve persisted happily in this rewarding endeavor for going on 14 years.  The entire program continues providing one-on-one tutoring for up to 100 adult ESL learners at any given time as well as night classes of four distinct levels twice a week at Kennett High School.  
4.who are your students?
An astonishing array of ESL students from all around the world join our program every year.  Though the majority of students intending to assimilate by learning the language and culture are from Mexico, each year we welcome many students from Asia, Europe, and all of Latin America.  In a count done several years ago, we were startled to learn that 52 countries were represented by our students over the previous ten years.  All ages of adults from very late teens to grandparents grace our daytime and nighttime classes.  
A25A2075
5. what’s most rewarding thing about being ESL instructor?

As an ESL instructor one is rewarded each day by being able to note our contribution to students’ English language improvement in communication through practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing.  Some of the program’s most prideful moments are learning that two brothers from Cote d’Ivoire are now local university graduates, numerous students have begun and maintained very successful businesses in Chester County, dozens of students have gone on to secure U.S. citizenship, several past students are now professors providing English as a Foreign Language (EFL) in their home countries of Brazil and Colombia.  Add to that, one of our administrative staff members not only learned her impeccable English at our ESL classes but also earned citizenship by fully participating in the Adult Literacy Program over several years.  It’s easy to understand from my experience with all of our students how important it is to provide ESL instruction.  Out of all their experiences in the classroom they grow and brighten their personalities with friendships, culture, and social awareness that can’t be learned elsewhere.