Category archives: portrait

 

This is Tara –owner of Scout and Annie Vintage Furniture and accessories shop. After I moved to Kennett Square, her shop is one of my hangout place, I like to go there check everything that she collected.I love her style, and dream one day my home will full of her furniture.

What did you do before you open Scout &Annie?

Before Scout & Annie, I was an attorney.  I loved it, but I meet much friendlier people now.

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How you got into this business? and what’s the meaning of Scout & Annie?

I started off by doing shows like Clover Market and the Brooklyn Flea Market.  I did well and was having fun, so took space in the West End Garage in Cape May.  That was a great experience, and I was inspired to go further and open a permanent shop.  Kennett Square is home, and it also happens to be a great downtown, so opening Scout & Annie on State Street was the obvious choice.  I have been open in Kennett Square since summer 2011.

Scout & Annie are the family dogs.  People sometimes ask if Scout & Annie are my kids, or call my husband “Scott” and me “Annie”.  And we answer to it.
 Where do you find your stuff?
The furniture and accessories in the shop come from many different sources, mostly people who contact me when they or a family member are downsizing.  I also have great relationships with other dealers who feed mid century modern gems to me.
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What do you love most about vintage furniture?
I love the timeless nature of vintage furniture, particularly mid century and Danish modern styles.  Clean lines, great materials, innovative design and quality construction mean that these pieces retain their classic appeal and live in your home as stylishly as they did half a century ago.  I think the recent recession reminded everyone about the importance of quality pieces that retain their value and usefulness.  There is a whole new generation moving into their own homes that has fallen in love with classic modern design, and they want vintage, not new.  Makes sense, as the milennials have been raised “green”, and vintage is a far more ecologically sound choice than new.  Just like restaurants with local menus, I make it a point to source as much as possible locally, which means no shipping or manufacturing resources/waste.  And not only is it perfect re-use, using vintage and salvage in your decor means your can put your unique stamp on your home.
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Can you give some tips about how to choose vintage furniture?
You can find great vintage in so many places – thrift stores, yard sales, flea markets.  I recommend heading out early and carrying cash.  You can politely negotiate, particularly if you are buying more than one item.  If you see something you love, don’t hesitate – it probably won’t be there when you return after “thinking about it”.  If you love an upholstered frame but hate the fabric, consider investing in professional reupholstery.  Costly, but a relative steal for a customized, quality piece.  And this is quirky but you’ll thank me later : SMELL the piece.  Yes, open the drawer and stick your head in there and ignore the funny looks.  Good wood smells nice or not at all, but avoid anything musty or reeking of cigarettes – this will not “air out”.  This is especially important at an outdoor market where stink may be harder to detect in the fresh air.  
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I wrote an email to Bob about the photo shoot and interview. I also forwarded a link of my website.  He said “Sure – you do a good job with those!Funny but looking at the pictures, you did one on the steps of my studio.  I remember working away and hearing people talking on my step and peeked out the window and saw you taking a photo and thought nothing of it until I looked at your site. ” That was my first story of Humans of Kennett Square with Bridget. What a coincidence! At that time I didn’t know that’s his studio.

 

When did you first realize you are an artist? and how did you make your dream come true?

Back when I was an Engineer I remember walking to the Kennedy Center in DC with a man involved in arts management. He asked what I did and I said that I was an Engineer but wanted to be an artist someday. He exclaimed, ” if you are making art, you are an artist! ” I was kind of shocked and apologetic, hemming and hawing, saying” Not really.” But he wouldn’t let it die, and explained that most artists don’t make a living from their work and if you have that impulse that you have to make something then you are an artist. I guess I am rather fortunate that I do actually make my living this way now.

As for making the dream come true – no one is “discovered”-it takes a heck of a lot of hustle.

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What famous artists have influenced you and how? 

You saw my art books, I am a junkie for looking at art. I walk to lunch every day with an art book that I thumb through. So, the influences are wide, varied, and too countless to mention. There is a little to learn from everyone.

But, when all is said and done, you need to look like yourself.
 

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What inspires you to create art and how do you keep motivated when things get tough in the studio?

Hmmm… Geez, it is something that is so ingrained in me that it is tough not to think about it now. This is my passion so it is hard for me to step out of it. I try to keep way head of myself with ideas. There is nothing worse than staring at a blank canvas wondering what to do, so I don’t let myself get there . I have countless sketchbooks lying around in which I write down ideas continuously. That way, when I need a new one, I can just thumb through any of these books.


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What is it about still life that keeps you painting them and what are you working on at the moment? 

I’ve always loved still life. It lets me pick objects, set them up much like a sculptor, and then immortalize them on canvas. I like working with these placid models that will allow me to work with them hours on end painting from life.

 Presently I am working on a commission for a client of a bunch of balloon dogs lined up at a makeshift bar make of my crates. Often my work is kind of hard for me to explain but I think you took some photos of me in progress on this one!

How have you handle the business side of being an artist?
Out of necessity! I have 3 kids, 2 that are in college right now. So, I have to make it work. Many artists complain about the gallery system, and giving them so much money. For me, I have loved it and it has worked. I need as many people as possible helping me to get me work out there. Handing your career professionally goes a long way. Keep deadlines, have organized presentations, answer correspondence, etc… Artists are notoriously bad at that.
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What advice would you give to an artist just starting out?

Don’t neglect the business side. No matter how well crafted your work, it has to get out there and work hard at it.
 

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Kristina is a self taught oil and watercolor artist. Her paintings filled with vivid color and translucent light. Her work focuses mainly on nature, ranging from landscape, birds, flowers,to cabbages.

 

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How and when did you start making art?

I can’t remember a time when I didn’t make things. I am always painting of course, and that is my true passion, but I love to try new mediums like right now I’m learning how to work with resin.

It’s easier to remember when I decided to make art my career. It was right after college, I was signed up for graduate school, I had even picked out classes, but I felt like it was a mistake and one thing led to another and I ended up with my own business.


 What inspires you?

Nature is a constant source of inspiration to me. Walking in the woods and seeing the beauty each season brings is always invigorating. Galleries also leave me brimming with ideas.

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Do you work from life, photographs or from imagination?

I work from all of the above! I usually have an idea of what to paint. Then I will gather things from life like cabbages or go and watch birds for a while. When I’m in the studio I sit down with many reference photos and sketch. If the weather is nice I will do a few plain air landscapes.

Is there an art work you are most proud of? why?

I love my cabbages, the larger ones are very work intensive and remind me of stained glass. I am also proud of my little birds, I have painted over a hundred so far. Each one has a special twinkle in its eye.

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 Is the artistic life lonely?

It can be. I am usually too engrossed in my work to notice. Of course having a one year old also stirs things up!

Who is your favorite artist? why?

I love Andrew Wyeth, Peter Sculthorpe, and John Singer Sargent.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given?

Actually some of the best advice I received was in an email exchange with Peter Sculthorpe. He told me that I had talent and to keep putting my work out there! When I feel down I bring up his email and it helps me to keep on going! It’s so amazing to get that sort of complement from an incredible artist.

This is Edmin. I bumped into her the other day.It’s not often you see this hair style in a small town. I was immediately attracted by her hairstyle.  ” I have had this style for 14 years.” she told me .

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“I came here one year ago. I was an artist , a graphic designer in Puerto rico. Now I’m studying English.

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She had a photography exhibition in Puerto rico. The exhibition’s title is  ¡Dejame ser!/ Let me be! She took pictures of women work at bar or strip club. ” The photographic documentation inspired by the poem “Redondillas” by Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz. In resume this feminist poem is about how the woman supposed have to be. If we does right thing or bad thing; no matter what we’re doing always we receive bad critics. The question is why, if his critic is the insist to we act.My pieces are mixed media; digital photography and graphic art printed on vinyl, canvas and sticker vinyl. I selected verses of the poem and I assigned to women they fulfilled that stereotype. In photography you will see the verse and character.”

“My dream is to open a gallery here, people can come see artworks and meet artists. Maybe your work will be there.”

I really love the concept of her exhibition, I wish I could see it here in her gallery one day!

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