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PeopleofKSQ | In The Eye Photograhy

Tags archives: PeopleofKSQ

 

Please tell us a little bit about yourself and your club?

I started ksqQWERTY very recently.  I am a writer and wanted a way to experience the combined fun of writing with my enthusiasm for the typewriter.  I thought it would be perfect to bring the two together in occasional and random pop-ups in and around Kennett Square. I hope to find other enthusiasts with typewriters to do some type-ins around town…maybe at the Kennett Library where I work or at one of the great coffee shops in town or at one of the many great events and venues Kennett is so prone to having!

How long have you been use a typewriter? and Why?

I had been carrying around a beautiful little portable typewriter that I found over 25 years ago at a thrift store in Philadelphia. I would type on it very occasionally but didn’t know how to maintain it or get ribbons for it and it eventually just sat on a shelf for many years.  Then no long ago, one very serendipitous and providential day, I met someone who was also an avid typewriter enthusiast and that sparked the motivation to actualize QWERTY.  I’ve been typing since.

How many typewriters do you have?  What’s their personality? 

I now have 9 typewriters and, as my son recently pointed out, they are each my favorite! My Olivetti Lettera 32 was my first typewriter – the one I found in the thrift store for $10. The next was a Adler Contessa also found at a thrift store. I have several older typewriter dating from the 40s and late 30s. They are gorgeous black shiny machines with little quirks that make them more easy to look at than type with. My most recent additions (kindly gifted to me by a total stranger who saw me at the Kennett Farmers Market) are a Smith Corona, a sturdy handsome thing that I will most likely use for most of my writing and also a lovely, lightweight turquoise portable Smith Corona from probably the 70s – perfect for taking out for a pop up event!

 

Can you talk a little about your project? 

Typing for the love of typing is fun (as opposed to having to type an over-due term paper full of type-o’s or typing office memoranda for an impatient boss under a looming deadline, also full of type-o’s). I love the snap the keys and seeing the type bars swing up and smack the paper and make the letters that march along forming words. Its like a little letter press! I love the bright “ding”! at the end of the line and “raaap” of the return carrier to start a new line. It makes writing a very physical, active, tactile, whole experience. Also typing is evidence of errors… they happen, you move on. Sometimes the errors have beauty and meaning, which I like. Sometimes they are annoying and uncomfortable, which is a good exercise in humility and living with imperfection.

 I feel connected to the making of the thing when I type. It pushes the process of writing beyond the conceptual/cerebral domain of working on a computer (it also doesn’t have the inherent distractions, such as Google, weather checks, email updates, etc… ) Writing on a typewriter is more emphatic and committed than writing with a pen or pencil. Though I write in all the above forms, and each lends to a slightly different product, I am currently infatuated with writing on and thinking about the typewriter.  Plus they are all just so beautiful!

 

 

          How did you get into music?

 My father is an avid music lover, and as a young child we would listen to records of his favorite        classical pieces. I think that is when I first got the music bug.  I then began learning the piano, and my piano teacher during my high school years thought I might be interested in conducting. That was when I began to explore conducting opportunities, My first time on the podium was with an amateur orchestra, and I remember it being much harder than I thought it would be. How hard could it be to wave your arms, I thought!  Nevertheless,  the thrill of conducting an orchestra was undeniable, and I have been  fortunate enough to have  those opportunities ever since.

What do you find to be the most challenging part of being a conductor?
The joy of conducting is bringing a great work of art to life.  The great irony is that on the one hand you make no sound at all, but on the other hand you are responsible for all that happens on the stage. One of the great challenges is to establish a musical chemistry with the orchestra such that collectively you produce a performance of the highest emotional and communicative power.  This begins with a great amount of  private score study, an ability to rehearse effectively often with only a few rehearsals, and then giving the orchestra the impetus and inspiration the music needs in performance. 
What is one piece that you’ve always wanted to conduct?  -And have you had that chance yet?
There are so many pieces that are thrilling to conduct, some I have gotten the chance to and others that I haven’t. One of my career highlights was conducting  Mahler’s 2nd Symphony. It is work that in Mahler’s words ‘encompasses the whole world’. It expresses the full range of emotions that we as human beings experience. The music also requires a very large orchestra, chorus and vocal soloists.   The power and the tenderness in the work are compelling.  It takes one on a emotional journey that stays with you long after the performance.  
 
 What are you listening to in your car (ipod, etc) right now?
​ 
When I am in the car on my own, I  most often listen to sports radio. When my fiance is with me, we will sometimes listen to 80’s stations. I don’t usually listen to classical music unless it is pieces I am working on. Every now and then, however, I will go on a stretch of  listening to classical pieces that I do not know to broaden my knowledge of the repertoire.
What do you think about Kennett Square? 
From the minute I came to Kennett Square for my audition, I was taken by the beauty and quaintness of the region.  That was almost 4 years ago. My family and I enjoy walking on State St, browsing the shops and enjoying a coffee or a bite to eat at the Market. In fact, we recently moved into the borough and are thrilled. It is an honor to be the Music Director of the Kennett Symphony and to work with these very talented professional musicians. If you haven’t enjoyed a concert of the Kennett Symphony, I invite you to come and enjoy one of our many concerts. 
 

One day I was shooting outside of Talula’s table, a lady walking towards me with a big warm smile : ” Hi, you must be Jie? I’m Bri from Fig Kennett.” That’s how I met Brianna, Director & Managing Editor of Fig Kennett Magazine.

 

What did you do before you joined Fig? 

I have a background in Corporate Marketing and spent my early career in the Banking industry doing Online Advertising. When I had my first baby, I wholeheartedly stepped away from full time work and became a stay-at-home mom. It was such a beautiful and fulfilling time for me. I cherish those years and consider them integral to shaping me into the person I am today. It was during those years at home that I decided to switch careers and pursue something creative that would make my heart skip a beat. I fell in love with photography & graphic design and started my own photography business just before joining the Fig team. I love that new seasons of life bring new opportunities. It is my current job with Fig that feels so full circle for me. I can apply all my previous skills and passions into one role. More than that, it feels incredibly rewarding to play a small part in helping the economy of this town that I love. It’s truly a privilege to help showcase all the talented business owners and community members that make Kennett so special. 
 I  love the Fig’s new issue–the hospitality issue, where did your idea come from? Do you have a theme for each issue?
The idea for the Hospitality theme came from my everyday simple interactions with people around town, especially the small business owners themselves. I was inspired by the teamwork and encouragement I saw among the business owners. Everyone helps each other out. Everyone wants the greater good for Kennett Square. And I was also inspired by the simple kindness of people around town. Doors are held open for you. Tables are shared among strangers. Recently someone offered me their parking spot because their meter had been paid up for an extra hour. I felt like this Spring issue of Fig needed to celebrate the homey, small town hospitality that I’ve experienced. 
Yes we do have a theme for each issue and we publish four times a year. Fig’s main pillars are local Dining, Shopping, Arts & Events. So our themes drill down on one of those areas each time in a fun and creative way. 
What makes Fig Magazine different from others on the market?
We are a hyper-local publication whose mission is ultimately to help Kennett Square thrive. We feel strongly that communities can be transformed through powerful design and creative communication. So Fig acts as a lookbook for Kennett Square. Our goal is to lift up the independent small businesses that give Kennett its personality and make it unique. If you live on the Main Line and you read Fig Kennett, we want you to get excited about visiting. Or if you live on Meredith Street in the borough, we want you to be proud that you live, work and entertain here. There are no other publications in this area that have this “love local” mission so prominently in mind with each issue.
What do you like most about Kennett Square?
I’m a small town girl. So I love that I can walk into Philter and see three people I know on any given day. I also love that Longwood Gardens is practically in my back yard. May I never take for granted all the beauty that surrounds me.

What is you typical workday look like? 
A typical day starts by putting my kids on the bus and then heading in to work at my State Street office. I turn on some music (probably Sia, Chris Stapleton or old school Michael Jackson if I’m in the mood to sing) and I’ll work on content creation, advertising proposals, design approvals, and meet with my advertisers. And everyday includes a walk around town to chat with business owners, grab something to eat, and snap a few photos for Fig’s social media channels. I like to end my day by making a list of to-do’s for the next morning because this job requires a lot of thoughtful planning. I feel like every task is an investment in Kennett Square, and that’s what motivates me!